The Use Of The Provisional Ball Rule

 

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The Use Of A Provisional Ball

This is the next in the Playing By The Rules Video Series.  Mike and Frank discuss the proper way of using a provisional ball.   We discuss what the rule states and how to go about it properly, because it matters to your score!

Announcing your intentions to hit a provisional ball is so important because if you don’t that next ball you do hit becomes the ball in play.  This leaves you no chance to find the original ball.
If you have questions on the Rules of Golf or comments on this video please leave them below.  As always, here is hope that you are Playing By The Rules!
Frank Guastella, PGA Rules Official Michigan Section PGA
Staff Writer, Mike Fay Golf
If you have a question for Frank here’s where you can contact him.
Email:  fguastella@franklin-golf.net
To “follow” Frank on Twitter click here
To “like” Frank on Facebook click here

Rub of the Green

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How many times have you been watching golf on television when you will hear one of the on air personalities describe a bad break to a player, such as a ball landing in a divot, as “rub of the green”? This is a misuse of the term. In the Rules of Golf, under definitions, “rub of the green” is defined as: “A rub of the green occurs when a ball in motion is accidentally deflected or stopped by any outside agency (see Rule 19 -1).”

The only time you will see the term “rub of the green” in the Rules of Golf is under Rule 19 -1 Ball in Motion Deflected or Stopped which states: “If a player’s ball in motion is accidentally deflected or stopped by any outside agency, it is rub of the green, there is no penalty and the ball must be played as it lies. An example of “rub of the green” would be a when a players golf shot hits a Direction Post (Decision 19-1/1). Such a deflection is “rub of the green” and the ball must be played as it lies without penalty.

An example that is NOT “rub of the green” would be when a players ball strikes his own caddie who is standing out of bounds and the ball comes to rest out of bounds. The player incurs a penalty of one stroke (Rule 19 – 2) and, since the ball lies out of bounds, he must proceed under Rule 27 -1, incurring another penalty stroke. That is a “bad break” and not “rub of the green”.

Hope you are “Playing by the Rules”. If you have any questions regarding the Rules of Golf, please submit them to mikefaygolf.com.

Frank Guastella, PGA Rules Official Michigan Section PGA
Staff Writer, Mike Fay Golf
If you have a question for Frank here’s where you can contact him.
Email:  fguastella@franklin-golf.net
To “follow” Frank on Twitter click here
To “like” Frank on Facebook click here

MFG Partners With Golf Training Aids

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We are very excited to announce the Mike Fay Golf has partnered with Golf Training Aids.com to help you play your best!  As a student of Mike’s you can take advantage of exclusive discounts and sales. Just click on the logo above and start shopping. Please contact Mike if you have any questions.

Making It To Scotland-Teezer 2

In 2001, 4 great friends made a pact that 10 years later they would make it to Scotland. A lifelong dream for 4 PGA Professionals to see the Home of Golf. Well, in 2011 they did it! Now see the emotion, see the passion, see Scotland through their eyes.  Over the next several months Mike Fay Golf brings you their story.

Golf is tough enough without proper vision to the hole. In this teezer we show you a hole at Kingsbarns and where you really don’t want to be. At this point, getting the ball out of the bunker is your biggest priority. Check it out!

Club Damaged In Normal Course of Play

 

Frank Guastella PGA Rules Coach

What happens during a round of play if one of your clubs becomes damaged during the course of play?  Rule 4 -3: Damaged Clubs: Repair and Replacement talks about damage in the normal course of play and damage other than in the normal course of play.  So what constitutes the “Normal Course of Play”?

The term “Normal Course of Play” is meant to cover all REASONABLE acts but specifically excludes cases of abuse.  In addition to making a stroke, practice swing or practice stroke, examples of acts that are in the “normal course of play” include: a.) removing or replacing a club in a bag; b.) using a club to search for or retrieve a ball (except by throwing a club); c.) leaning on a club while waiting to play, teeing a ball or removing a ball from the hole; d.) accidentally dropping a club.

Examples of acts that are not in the “normal course of play” include: a.) throwing a club whether in anger, in retrieving a ball or otherwise; b.) “slamming” a club into a bag; c.) intentionally striking something (e.g. the round or a tree) with the club other than during a stroke, practice swing or practice stroke.

As long as the club was damaged in the normal course of play, a player may: a.) use the club in its damaged state for the remainder of the stipulated round; b.) without unduly delaying play, repair it or have it repaired; c.) as an additional option available only if the club is unfit for play, replace the damaged club with any club.  The replacement of a club must not unduly delay play (Rule 6-7) and must not be made by borrowing any club selected for play by any other person playing on the course or by assembling components carried by or for the player during the stipulated round.

If, during a stipulated round, a player’s club is damaged other than in the normal course of play rendering it non-conforming or changing its playing characteristics, the club must not subsequently be used or replaced during the round.

If you have a question on the Rules of Golf, please submit it Mike Fay Golf and I hope you are “Playing By The Rules”.

Frank Guastella, PGA Rules Official Michigan Section PGA
Staff Writer, Mike Fay Golf
If you have a question for Frank here’s where you can contact him.
Email:  fguastella@franklin-golf.net
To “follow” Frank on Twitter click here
To “like” Frank on Facebook click here

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