How To Repair A Ball Mark

How To Repair A Ball Mark

 

The USGA has released a great video about repairing ball marks we wanted to share with you.  In the following video, find out why it’s important to fix a ball mark and why doing it incorrectly can do more harm than good.

Taking care of the course is our responsibility to the game.  It’s recommended that all players to fix yours and one other.  See if you fix ball marks like this.

Special thanks to the USGA for producing this video.  Thank you for watching and please leave your comments below.

Source:  USGA

Mike Fay

Mike Fay

PGA Director of Instruction

With over 25 years of teaching experience, it’s easy to see why Mike has become a leader in the world of golf instruction. Everything from cutting edge social networking techniques to having his own podcast, Mike has helped to change the face of teaching golf.  He currently is the Director of Player Performance at the Boyne Golf Academy in Harbor Springs, Michigan.

Email:  mike@mikefaygolf.com

Factors of Controlling Golf Ball Spin

Factors Of Controlling Golf Ball Spin

 

We all watch the pros on TV and think:  How did they get that golf ball to stop so fast?  How about back up? What makes that golf ball spin so much?

Making the ball spin is cool, but using the spin and knowing how to do it to lower your score is very important.

Spin=Control

Yes, the more you can control the spin, the more you can control your distance, the closer you hit the ball to the target.

So, what influences spin?  A number of factors but mainly:  FRICTION

Friction?  Yes friction created with club to ball contact. Ever wonder why when you are next to the green in the rough and your ball won’t stop on the green?  This is because grass gets trapped between the clubface and the ball and….less friction….less spin….less stopping power.  This is also the reason why a golf ball spins more off a tighter cut of grass.

Another factor effecting spin is speed.  The more speed you can have around the green, typically the more spin you can create.

So now you know the some factors you need to create spin.  The more spin, the more control.

Here’s a video by NBC Learn and the USGA with high speed video of what ball and club contact actually looks like.  Awesome stuff!

 

 
Mike Fay

Mike Fay

PGA Director of Instruction

With over 25 years of teaching experience, it's easy to see why Mike has become a leader in the world of golf instruction. Everything from cutting edge social networking techniques to having his own podcast, Mike has helped to change the face of teaching golf.  He currently is the Director of Instruction at Walnut Creek Country Club in South Lyon, Michigan.

Email:  mike@mikefaygolf.com

Chip The Ball Better

Chip The Ball Better

 

In this video from the Mike Fay Golf Channel, Mike explains what good players with excellent short games do when they chip the golf ball.  This is what a chip shot looks like and feels like.  We all want to chip the ball better right?  It lowers our scores.  Where the ball is positioned and how the ball should come off the club face.  Do you have a comment?  Leave it below.

Mike Fay

Mike Fay

PGA Director of Instruction

With over 25 years of teaching experience, it's easy to see why Mike has become a leader in the world of golf instruction. Everything from cutting edge social networking techniques to having his own podcast, Mike has helped to change the face of teaching golf.  He currently is the Director of Instruction at Walnut Creek Country Club in South Lyon, Michigan.

Email:  mike@mikefaygolf.com

Bad Takeaways Can Lead To Bad Golf Swings

Bad Takeaways Can Lead To Bad Golf Swings

 

Staying connected is a major source of power in the golf swing.  We usually see two different faults that can cause you problems with connection and they both are rooted in the takeaway.  Both can rob you from solid contact and power.

The first of these faults is shown below.  The path of the club on the right shows a takeaway that is way above the desired line of the backswing.  This usually leads to lifting of the body on the backswing, sometimes a reverse spine angle, and lack of rotation of the shoulders and torso.  From this position at the top, without a serious re-routing of the club, tends to lead the player to bring the club back down on the same very steep “over the top” path.   Making for non-solid golf shots and a ball that travels off line.

The next fault we often see is a disconnection of the upper lead arm and hands on the takeaway.  A “handsy” takeaway that leads the club too far under the plane line on the backswing.  This also causes a lack of rotation of the shoulders because the lead arm is running into the torso to quickly.  The trail arm needs enough space on the downswing.  Without creating that space on the takeaway, you are doomed from the start.  This can also lead to a “over the top” motion.

Above is a video where Mike describes a drill that will help you get that club started on the right path and keep you connected.

Thanks for reading and please comment below.

Mike Fay

Mike Fay

PGA Director of Instruction

With over 25 years of teaching experience, it's easy to see why Mike has become a leader in the world of golf instruction. Everything from cutting edge social networking techniques to having his own podcast, Mike has helped to change the face of teaching golf.  He currently is the Director of Instruction at Walnut Creek Country Club in South Lyon, Michigan.

Email:  mike@mikefaygolf.com

Risk-Reward

Risk-Reward

 

Is the risk worth the reward?  When playing par 5’s it’s tough not to want to “go for it” every time.  You have a access what is really going on with the golf course.

Course management alone can help you save strokes.  Knowing your carry yardages for all clubs plays a roll in this.  Having a yardage book or measuring device, the weather conditions, and really how are you performing that particular day determines the choice you make.  Watch this video for some helpful tips to save some golf shot.

Mike Fay

Mike Fay

PGA Director of Instruction

With over 25 years of teaching experience, it's easy to see why Mike has become a leader in the world of golf instruction. Everything from cutting edge social networking techniques to having his own podcast, Mike has helped to change the face of teaching golf.  He currently is the Director of Instruction at Walnut Creek Country Club in South Lyon, Michigan.

Email:  mike@mikefaygolf.com

How To Build A Wedge Range

How To Build A Wedge Range

 

Want to score better?  Of course you do!  The Wedge Range at Boyne Mountain Resort opened this past July to rave reviews!  A place to help you with your game from 100 yards and in!

In this video, we discuss how we built the wedge range at Boyne Mountain Resort including the costs involved and time.  You would be amazed that for only a few dollars you can add so much to your facility. 

What’s a Wedge Range?  Our wedge range at Boyne Mountain is specifically designed for you to “dial” in your shots from 30-100 yards.  Spread out in a baseball diamond shape at the back of the Boyne Mountain Learning Center are cement targets placed in the ground.

Hit the target and watch your ball sail into the air! All distances on the Wedge Range are measured from a plate mounted in the middle of the teeing ground back there.  So, where ever you go, you can play from just about any distance you want.

Now you will know exactly how far you hit your clubs! Come up and play on Northern Michigan’s first Wedge Range!  Lower your scores and have fun!

Mike Fay

Mike Fay

PGA Director of Instruction

With over 25 years of teaching experience, it's easy to see why Mike has become a leader in the world of golf instruction. Everything from cutting edge social networking techniques to having his own podcast, Mike has helped to change the face of teaching golf.  He currently is the Director of Instruction at Walnut Creek Country Club in South Lyon, Michigan.

Email:  mike@mikefaygolf.com

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